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blue Laurel Canyon Loop

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Trail

3.7 mile 5.9 kilometer loop
Singletrack
Intermediate

Elevation

Ascent: 607' 185 m
Descent: -606' -185 m
High: 812' 247 m
Low: 227' 69 m

Grade

Avg Grade: 6% (4°)
Max Grade: 24% (14°)

Dogs

No Dogs
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Map Key

Trail shared by John McKinney

An easy loop in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park.

John McKinney

Features Birding · River/Creek · Views · Wildlife

Trails may be closed for three days following rain.

Overview

A short 3.7-mile loop of the Laurel Canyon Trail and Willow Canyon Trail.

Need to Know

Park hours are from 7 am to sunset. Parking lot hours are from 8 am to 5 pm.
Parking fees are $3 per car daily.

Description

From the Willow Canyon staging area, take Willow Canyon Trail west to the junction with Laurel Canyon Trail. Head north on the trail paralleling Laguna Canyon Road. Hikers will pass coastal sage shrub and interesting wind and water eroded caves and rock formations.

At about 0.2 miles, the trail turns away from the road and heads northwest into Laurel Canyon. The trail ascends the canyon through oak and sycamore trees along a creek and ends at 1.6 miles at the intersection with Upper Laurel Canyon Trail and Laurel Spur. Turn left onto Laurel Spur heading south.

At the intersection with Willow Canyon Trail, turn left onto the doubletrack trail which heads back south to the Willow Canyon parking lot. There are some nice views of parkland as hikers descend this trail.

Some of these trails are multi-use so know the right-of-way rules and be aware of other users.

Thanks to John McKinney, The Trailmaster, for sharing this trail description. To learn more about trails in California, check out his guides at The Trailmaster Store.

Flora & Fauna

Laguna Coast Wilderness Park is part of a system designed to protect endangered species. Some of these are the Cactus Wren, California Gnatcatcher, and Orange-Throated Whiptail.
The park helps to protect the diminishing coastal sage environments.

History & Background

Once known as Rancho San Joaquin, the area was purchased by James Irvine in 1865 to be used to graze cattle. Extensive conservation efforts and a rise in taxes have helped preservation efforts in the area since.

Contacts

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Check-Ins

Sep 15, 2018
Joseph Gutierrez
3.6mi
Jun 23, 2018
C L
Jan 21, 2018
Karin Erickson
3.7mi
Nov 24, 2017
Jose Malagon

Stewarded By


Trail Ratings

  3.0 from 1 vote

#3623

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  3.0 from 1 vote
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Rankings

#568

in California

#3,623

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58 Views Last Month
1,001 Since Aug 3, 2017
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