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Greenbrier Ridge Trail

Intermediate
 3.0 (2)

An ascent to the AT with rich wildflowers and multiple mountain streams. Great views along the way.


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Map Key

4.2

Miles

6.8

KM

Point to Point

4,775' 1,455 m

High

3,189' 972 m

Low

1,611' 491 m

Up

26' 8 m

Down

7%

Avg Grade (4°)

14%

Max Grade (8°)

Dogs No Dogs

Features Fall Colors · River/Creek · Spring · Views · Wildflowers · Wildlife

Great Smoky Mountain National Park closes secondary roads on a seasonal schedule due to snow. Schedules can be found here.

All campsites must be registered with the park. Backcountry rules and regulations can be found here.

Description

Greenbrier Ridge Trail is a fairly easy trail that connects Lynn Camp Prong Trail and Middle Prong Trail with the Appalachian Trail near the Derrick Knob Shelter.

Beginning at the Indian Flats Falls, hikers will head south and gradually ascend roughly 1,600 feet before reaching the Appalachian Trail. This is a gorgeous trail, as hikers will come across mountain streams (two crossings), a great variety of wildflowers and some decent views along the way. Not a bad trail for photography aficionados!

The forest is initially quite thick with rhododendrons and other vegetation but eventually opens up a bit more as the trail nears the AT. Roughly halfway into the trail, hikers will reach the ridgeline. Once reaching the AT, hikers can head left for Miry Ridge Trail and Silers Bald or right towards the Derrick Knob Shelter.

Flora & Fauna

The Smokies are home to more than 1,600 species of plants, most of which produce an abundance of flowers in the spring. These species include mountain laurel, rhododendron, azalea, and many others. Spring wildflowers peak from early April through late May. To learn more about the plants of the Smokies and even get a trees and shrubs checklist, visit the park's website.

As for local fauna, black bears are common in the area, along with white-tailed deer and 31 species of salamanders. Birdwatchers can spot a variety of species, notably the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) and red-eyed vireo (Vireo olivaceus). For more information on black bears, refer to this webpage.

Contacts

Shared By:

Max Willner

Trail Ratings

  3.0 from 2 votes

#11

in Tremont

#24211

Overall
  3.0 from 2 votes
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Trail Rankings

#11

in Tremont

#518

in North Carolina

#24,211

Overall
22 Views Last Month
1,244 Since Sep 4, 2015
Intermediate

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Check-Ins

Jun 27, 2020
Brian Carpenter
checked this one off the list 8.4mi
Jun 24, 2018
Jerry Willis
Sep 4, 2017
Jessie Spielvogel
Jan 29, 2016
buddy beavers