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Featured Hikes v. Trails


Original Post
Gunks Jesse · · Shawangunk Township, NY · Joined May 2014 · Points: 619

I truly don't understand the difference between how to create a featured hike and a trail. They seem to be the same process. When do I use one versus the other? If its an out and back is it a trail? If it is a loop is it a featured hike? What if it loops but by using a different trail? Do I create each trail individually, then duplicate them all as a featured hike? If that is the case, it would seem like anybody could go and create any variation of trails to put together any random assortment of featured hikes...

· · Unknown Hometown · Joined unknown · Points: 0

Hey Jesse,

Thanks for reaching out. Hopefully I can help clear up some confusion for you!

A Trail is just a single trail as you would find on a traditional map. A Featured Hike is a complete, recommended route that might include parts or all of several Trails and maybe even a portions of roads to connect them. More info here: FAQ

Let me know if this begs any more questions.

Cheers,
Tom

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 448

Ok, I think I have this down now. A trail is a trail, starts at point A and either loops to point A or ends at point B. A featured trail is an awesome trail. It can solely be the aforementioned trail, but better yet, it can be a combination of portions of trails. The featured trail that I have put together required that I edit the gpx files of 3 other trails to get the track correct. Then it required that I enter photo's.

While a normal trail has only the recent hike gpx. Photo's are optional.

Brian Smith · · Boulder, CO · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 10,608

@Dallas - You're on the right track. Here's the best way I can think to explain the difference:

Google Maps...we're all familiar, right? Think of Trails on Hiking Project (HP) as the streets that make up Google's base map. Think of Featured Hikes on HP as the directions that Google spits out and overlays on top of the street base map.

If streets aren't mapped at all, or are only partially mapped, the directions become less useful. What happens if you make a wrong turn and only the route shows on the map? Luckily, this isn't the case - Google has an incredibly robust database and you can easily find an alternate route. This is what we're striving for!

We want individual trails to be mapped in their entirety so that folks understand how a trail system is structured. This gives people the option to either alter or shorten a featured hike based on their knowledge of the overall trail system.

Does that make sense? With all of that in mind, it should also be mentioned that featured hikes are only the most popular hikes in a given area. Photos are required because they show people why a featured hike is the best.

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 448

I think I get it. Now for the next silly question. In doing the Smith Rock trails I added each named trail individually, then combined sections of these trails to make the two featured trails. What I couldn't figure out was how to use the already uploaded GPS coordinates to get the directions for the featured trails.

To get the featured trails I had to edit my own GPS tracks and then create a new GPX file that I uploaded.

Can you point me to a HP tutorial for editing GPX trails, I have 3 issues I could not figure out;

1. I could not move the start point.
2. I could not add waypoints
3. I could not overlay a GPX trail I uploaded, I had to delete it and re-upload.

Brian Smith · · Boulder, CO · Joined Dec 2014 · Points: 10,608

Dallas - Check out this thread: hikingproject.com/forum/rea...

I think that might answer your question, but to elaborate, we currently do not have a way to build hikes from existing trails. I (along with many other) wish we did and it's something that we're working towards!

What we do have is the ability to build individual trails from a featured hike. I know this may seem bassackwards, but it works quite well!

Check out these video tutorials from out mountain bike site:

- vimeo.com/64912356
- vimeo.com/64912795
- vimeo.com/64913399
- vimeo.com/64913818

m Mobes · · MDI, ME · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 22

The difference between the two is still confusing as hell and the existing explanation is terrible-

"A Trail is just a single trail as you would find on a traditional map. A Featured Hike is a complete, recommended route that might include parts or all of several Trails and maybe even a portions of roads to connect them."

I listed a trail a few days ago (my first addition to the database) that is the only trail listed in the NE quadrant of CT. I made the mistake? of listing it as a featured hike... to me it is, especially since nothing else is listed within 30 miles. This website is a working project so as the area fills in changes can be made if needed and I expect there will be changes since there are many more trails to list in this park and this region.

I also suggest that they are all trails so why not let the "featured" trails become "featured" trails by user ratings? Mtn Proj does this and it seems to work well, I heavily rely on user ratings over there.

I'd also love to see more info on how to use my smartphone/GPS to keep track of trails more easily so I dont have to draw them out by hand on the site. I am electronically challenged BTW

Dallas R · · Traveling the USA · Joined May 2013 · Points: 448

I too had the same issue, but decided to adjust my thinking on it, not because I like the way things are but because I am utilizing software that someone else has taken a great deal of time and effort to put together and I respect their efforts.

So will continue to build individual trails, then when I have several in, I will link them together for a feature. The biggest problem I ran into was that many of the trails I hike are parts of longer trails. That meant I had to hike all of the trails in the area before I could make my featured trail.

If you feel like it, create another thread asking how to transfer tracks from your favorite hike tracking device. I will attempt to assist if I can. If not, the forum admins have been really good about responding.

m Mobes · · MDI, ME · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 22

"So will continue to build individual trails, then when I have several in, I will link them together for a feature. The biggest problem I ran into was that many of the trails I hike are parts of longer trails. That meant I had to hike all of the trails in the area before I could make my featured trail."

this makes more sense

Tom Robson · · Boulder, CO · Joined Mar 2015 · Points: 12,045

@Mike: You're totally right, that description is not very straightforward... In general, however, the workflow for adding content is the opposite of how you're thinking of it. Which I'm sure is very frustrating!

Unless someone is intent on showcasing ALL of the trails in their area, we like people to start adding content via a featured hike. We have refined our definition of featured hikes, but the FAQ page has yet to reflect it. Our new definition is this: Featured Hikes are the most popular routes in a given area. They are complete, recommended ways to use trails. In some cases, they might include parts or all of several trails and maybe even portions of road to connect them.

I hope this new definition answers your question regarding whether or not to make your upload a featured hike. If it is one of the most popular routes in an area, then you should make it a featured hike, for sure! If not, just add the trails and folks can create their own way of using the trail system.

From that featured hike you can build the underlying trails. A trail is exactly what you'd see on a paper map. I've done a little research with regards to your Scantic River upload and have had a lot of trouble finding a map online. So, as the "boots on the ground" we will have to trust that the trails you add are exactly how the CT DEEP defines them using signage on the ground.

I hope all of this helps, Mike. Please post here with more questions.

-Tom

m Mobes · · MDI, ME · Joined Mar 2006 · Points: 22
Tom Robson wrote:
@Mike: You're totally right, that description is not very straightforward... In general, however, the workflow for adding content is the opposite of how you're thinking of it. Which I'm sure is very frustrating!

Unless someone is intent on showcasing ALL of the trails in their area, we like people to start adding content via a featured hike. We have refined our definition of featured hikes, but the FAQ page has yet to reflect it. Our new definition is this: Featured Hikes are the most popular routes in a given area. They are complete, recommended ways to use trails. In some cases, they might include parts or all of several trails and maybe even portions of road to connect them.

I hope this new definition answers your question regarding whether or not to make your upload a featured hike. If it is one of the most popular routes in an area, then you should make it a featured hike, for sure! If not, just add the trails and folks can create their own way of using the trail system.

From that featured hike you can build the underlying trails. A trail is exactly what you'd see on a paper map. I've done a little research with regards to your Scantic River upload and have had a lot of trouble finding a map online. So, as the "boots on the ground" we will have to trust that the trails you add are exactly how the CT DEEP defines them using signage on the ground.

I hope all of this helps, Mike. Please post here with more questions.

-Tom


OK, much more clear now. The local admin seemed to think it fell under the trail category but now that I read your reply/description I believe it would fall under the featured hike of the area it is in since there are a ton of side trails and loops with the river being the main trail. here is a link- hollowhiker.com/wp-content/...
Guideline #1: Don't be a jerk.

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